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In Pictures: construction starts at Crossrail's Wallasea Island

A new man-made island to be made from 4.5 million tonnes of excavated material from Crossrail has been launched.

Environment secretary Owen Paterson today officially launched the nature project that will guarantee a place for tens of thousands of migratory birds, and combat threats from climate change and coastal flooding.

Wallasea Island in the Thames Estuary will be transformed from levee-protected farmland into a thriving wetland, twice the size of the City of London and teeming with bird and marine life.

Crossrail will deliver 4.5 million tonnes of clean earth from the construction of major new rail tunnels under London to help build the nature reserve at Wallasea.

The earth will be used to create higher and lower ground to restore the wetland landscape of mudflats, saltmarsh and lagoons last seen 400 years ago.

A jetty constructed by Bam Nuttall to receive 4.5 million tonnes of excavated material arriving by ship from Northfleet, Essex has already been built.

Mr Paterson said: “The excellent work that Crossrail and the RSPB are doing to create the Jubilee Marshes at Wallasea shows how major infrastructure schemes can help to generate economic growth as well as helping to improve local wildlife. This could be the gold standard against which all future projects are measured.”

Crossrail chief executive Andrew Wolstenholme said: “This landmark project is a pioneering example of how the construction industry and environment groups can work in partnership to build a sustainable Britain that benefits both the economy and the environment. Crossrail is delighted to be involved in a project that will leave a lasting legacy long after the construction of the new rail line has been completed.”

About eight miles of coastal walks and cycle routes will also be created as part of the project, which means that the nature reserve will also become a wonderful place for people to explore and enjoy.

At its peak 10,000 tonnes of material will be unloaded from ships per day. Crossrail will deliver more than 2,000 ship loads of excavated material to Wallasea Island.

The earth will be transported from Crossrail’s western tunnels via freight train from west London to Northfleet in Kent where it will be loaded on to ships. Excavated material will also be loaded onto ships directly from the eastern tunnelling site at Limmo near Canning Town station in east London, with further material shipped from a storage site on the River Thames at Barking.

The government has set a combined target for the recreation of saltmarshes and mudflats, of 3,600 hectares (8,895 acres) by 2015.  The Wallasea Island Wild Coast Project will deliver 670 hectares of marshland.

The Essex estuaries are in the top five most important coastal wetlands in the country and are protected by national and European law.

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