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Scottish contractor falls into administration

Scottish civil engineering contractor MK Leslie has entered administration with 50 job losses.

The Shetland and Inverness-based contractor ceased trading on 30 July when KPMG was appointed as administrator.

Nine members of staff are continuing to assist KPMG administrators with existing contracts and site maintenance, but MK Leslie’s remaining 50 employees were made redundant.

KPMG joint administrator Blair Nimmo said: “MK Leslie is a well-known firm with a strong reputation in Shetland and the north of Scotland.

“However the company has suffered through continued economic challenges and was directly affected when a number of its customers went out of business.”

Mr Nimmo added: “Unfortunately on our appointment we had no option but to make a number of immediate redundancies.

“We will be working with all affected staff to help them find the support they need to find new employment and thank all involved for their co-operation in this difficult time.”

Last month Scottish Highlands-based stone supplier Caithness Stone Industries fell into administration following cash flow problems.

MK Leslie was set up in 1983 and specialised in plant hire, construction, civil engineering, pipeline construction, landfill development and demolition services in northern Scotland.

It worked as a subcontractor for Balfour Beatty, R.J.McLeod and Robertson Homes and as a main contractor on public sector projects for NHS Scotland and Shetland Islands Council.

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