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A fluid, evolving business plan is the key to long-term success

When I think of business plans, there’s one word that I keep coming back to: evolution.

The ability to have a fluid business plan that you are constantly striving to evolve and improve is one that will deliver long-term success.

A rigid, one-dimensional business plan would simply not have allowed us to make the transition from the leisure sector into the construction industry as successfully as we did three years ago.

Market research

We introduced our WES Fire Safety range to the UK construction industry at a challenging time, which is why it was imperative that we undertook significant levels of market research to formulate the most robust business plan we could.

“The ability to have a fluid business plan that you are constantly striving to evolve and improve is one that will deliver long-term success”

We did this by entering into constructive dialogue with leading contractors and influential people within the industry, utilising the invaluable resources of Glenigan and liaising with knowledgeable suppliers and agencies.

This knowledge exchange gave us the industry insight we needed to create a business plan that would allow us to launch into the sector with a solid backbone.

We knew the construction industry would inevitably experience a positive turnaround, so this initial period allowed us to iron out any logistical, financial, manufacturing and supply issues and adjust the plan accordingly.

Stepping back

It would have been easy to get carried away with the excitement of launching an established product into a new market, which is why having a defined business plan is so important – to keep everyone grounded.

“My role is a little like the conductor of an orchestra, who is responsible for the broader perspective and ensures that everyone plays to the same beat”

Thinking about the myriad of possibilities and opportunities that await is enough to get the pulse racing, so it’s crucial to have people in the business with the ability to look at the plan with a cold, clinical eye.

They can ensure that what you’re setting out to achieve offers a long-term and sustainable roadmap that everyone can follow.

Breaking our business plan into smaller, bite-sized chunks that can then be allocated to specialists within the business was hugely beneficial.

Someone at the top

Of course, there does need to be someone that oversees these components to ensure they are all working to agreed deadlines and for the greater good of the business.

I suppose my role is a little like the conductor of an orchestra, who is responsible for the broader perspective and ensures that everyone plays to the same beat.

At the core of our business and our plan is a resolute belief that we are not driven by short-term profits, but by a desire to develop a sustainable business.

We have made decisions with this firmly in mind and believe that a robust, yet constantly evolving, business plan will continue to guide us as we make further strides in the construction industry.

Andy Hicks is managing director of Ramtech

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