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01Oct92 UK: YOUNG CONSTRUCTION WORKERS SHOULD BE SUPERVISED BY EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS.

Young workers should work alongside experienced employees during their first few weeks on site to reduce the industry's appalling accident rate.That is the message from Tarmac personnel director Frank Duggan, who believes a shake-up in the safety training system is the only answer to avoiding tragedies on site.Mr Duggan warned that inexperienced workers are allowed on the job with inadequate training and supervision.Speaking at an Institution of Civil Engineers' safety seminar on Tuesday he said: 'With the disappearance of the apprentice and the growth of the self-employed, the young professional is handed responsibility for safety very early; it is a large hurdle to climb.'Mr Duggan called for a three-point plan to be introduced for workers during their first few weeks on the job:- a site tour conducted by a senior manager where new workers have to compile their own safety report;- safety induction courses covering every aspect of the site operations; and- experienced workers taking new recruits under their wing to highlight the pitfalls of life on site.Mr Duggan also called for vast improvements in the safety training side of degrees and other exams by construction professionals.Other ideas put forward to encourage safety awareness on site included prizes for jobs with the lowest accident rates.Mr Duggan said: 'Safety has not yet gained the recognition that it warrants. With our prevailing record we have to act now and ensure a programme of training and education is built to avoid tunnel vision with safety training outside the field of view.'